4 = 5 I1 Solve for I1 I1 = 4 / 5 = 0.8 A The two resistors are in series and therefore the same current passes through them. This article has been viewed 243,944 times. Just make sure to use quantities that refer to the same portion of the circuit. What is the resistance of the resistor in the circuit? Fill out the chart with all values provided in the problem. Ohm's Law works with values in the same row. Find the voltage across resistor R2 and the current passing through the same resistor. Use the properties of series circuits to fill blank spaces in columns: In the classroom, however, you do not need to find the power and energy unless the problem asks you to. V2 = R2 I2 = 10 (0.8) = 8 V, Example 3 Once the current through the resistor is known and you have found the resistance, you can now solve for voltage drop across the resistor (Voltage = Current x Resistance). Substitute R by 2 and V by 6 in Ohm's law V = R I. I = 6 / 2 = 3 A, Example 2 If you really can’t stand to see another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. You know the values of V and R for the light bulb, so you can use Ohm's Law to solve for the current: I = 80V / 100Ω = 0.8 A (amps) Because the current is the same anywhere on a series circuit, the answer is 0.8 amps. © problemsphysics.com. The voltage across resistor R1 is equal to 4 V. Find the current passing through resistor R2 and the voltage across the same resistor. The graph below represents the voltage V across a resistor against the current I passing through the same resistor. Hence the current I2 through R2 is equal to 0.8 A. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/1\/1e\/Solve-a-Series-Circuit-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Solve-a-Series-Circuit-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/1\/1e\/Solve-a-Series-Circuit-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/aid484350-v4-728px-Solve-a-Series-Circuit-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

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\n<\/p><\/div>"}. We go through solving a circuit which only containes independent sources: two voltage sources and two current sources. The relationship is written as. The current passing through a resistor in a circuit is 0.01 A when the voltage across the same resistor is 5 V. What current passes through this resistor when the voltage across it is 7.5 V? Ralph Childers is a master electrician based in the Portland, Oregon area with over 30 years of conducting and teaching electrical work. Course. A. Rearrange Ohm's Law to solve for current: I = V / R. To find the voltage (voltage drop across a resistor) mathematically, you need to know the resistance total of the resistor and the current flowing through the resistor. When the electricity is not properly used, it results in electrical shocks with a nasty experience. What happens if one bulb is removed from a series circuit? Solution to Example 5 Solution to Example 4 wikiHow is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. Electric Current and Circuits Example Problems with Solutions.pdf. C. Electric current I 1. This is not a lot of current. A series circuit is the simplest type of circuit: a single loop with no branching paths. I = 7.5 / 500 = 0.015 A, Example 5 I1 = 4 / 5 = 0.8 A D. Current I 2. All the formulas in this section work for the circuit as a whole, or for individual components. Solution to Example 3 How do I setup the equation to find the resistance? 6 = 2 I If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website. Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. On a circuit diagram, a resistor looks like a zig-zag in the wire. Be careful: you cannot use the circuit's total voltage drop 220V. Multiply by seconds to get an energy result in Joules. The electrical charge leaves the positive terminal of the power supply, passes through each resistor or other components in turn, then returns to the negative terminal. Electric current : I = V / R = 12 Volt / 6 Ohm = 2 Ampere .